Business Management, Business Development, Business Plans & Feasibility Reports

Business Management, Business Development, Business Plans & Feasibility Reports 

Business Management, Business Development, Business Plans & Feasibility Reports
Business Management, Business Development, Business Plans & Feasibility Reports – is a total breakdown for your business from startup to Business success. It emphases is on Business Management, Business Development, Business Plans & Feasibility Reports. This guide is free for all, but our main interest is for you to success in your business. 

In this article, we sited different authors in relation to Business Management, Business Development, Business Plans & Feasibility Reports in our contemporary world, of which some where site from the following topics; 


MICRO DIVISION OF LABOUR 


This system is employed in large factories automated assembly lines 

Job are broken down into the smallest possible elements 

Each member of the first team in the production line performs its part of the production process then the unfinished product is moved to the next group until all the elements of the product is complete 

ADVANTAGES OF MICRO DIVISION OF LABOUR 


  1. Production does not depend on skilled people and so the absence of any individual does not interfere with the work 
  2. Work can be closely controlled 

DISADVANTAGES OF MICRO DIVISION OF LABOUR 


1. Jobs are monotonous and boring 

2. There is no scope to do the work better or more quickly; machines control the rate of work 

3. People who work on assemble line have little opportunity for social contact 

JOB ROTATION AND ENLARGEMENT 


JOB ROTATION; moving employees from job to job giving them opportunities to perform a greater variety of tasks at the same level of responsibility 

JOB ENLARGEMENT; expanding number of task performed usually at the same level of responsibility 

DO YOU THINK THESE APPROACHES MOTIVATE PEOPLE? Yes/No (if you say no, then you will be correct)

REDESIGNING THE WORKING TO PROVIDE THE STAFF WITH 


1. More variety and responsibility;

2. More opportunities for development of skills 

3. More control over their present work 

4. More work feedback about the work they are doing 

Step to enrich jobs 


1. Remove unnecessary controls, increase responsibility and autonomy 

2. Clarify goals.

3. Provide feedback 

4. Provide opportunities for development of skills and knowledge 

Job rotation and enlargement do not motivate staff. They may increase the quantity of work but do not create opportunities for development. 

On the other hand, job enrichment motivate employees has it often give them the chance to gain experience and improve their skills. It gives them the opportunity to develop and advance inside the company job enrichment is the way to motivation. 

THE ROLE OF A MANGER IN MOTIVATING STAFF 


The team leader (manager) 

  • Coach
  • Facility 
  • Empower 
Responsibility of a team leader / manager 

  • Set plans 
  • Organise 
  • Guide 
  • Leads 

TEAM LEADER MAY FIND HIM/HERSELF IN DIFFICULT SITUATION 


  1. The company is being reorganized or down-sized 
  2. Colleagues being made redundant 
  3. Uncertainty about the economic situation of the company 
  4. Any other cause of uncertainty 

TO KEEP UP MORALE AND MOTIVATION 


1. Seek information and pass on as clear a picture as possible 

2. Counter cynicism with a positive approach 

3. Keep the team occupied with meaningful work but do not overwhelm them with work 

4. Establish new mutually supportive relationship with members of the work team 

5. Acknowledge and discuss with remaining staff their possible feeling of guilt 



  1. Create the right kind of climate or atmosphere 
  2. Give rewards where they’re deserved 
  3. Promote the worth of the job 
  4. Keep the work team informed 
  5. Be fair in allocating work 
  6. Make work fun
  7. Taking account of the circumstances under which people have to work. 
  8. Give your team members scope for development 
  9. Avoid treat to job security 
  10. Make the team members target and objective clear 

WHAT IS CHANGE MANAGEMENT?


Change management is how to initiate change continuously and incorporate that change into a managed corporate environment 

Resistance management is the biggest challenge in change management 

Change management is a process which involve both initiating the change and incorporating it through building a new culture and infrastructure for the change to be sustainable. 

The roles of manager in managing change 

Leadership and management are often used interchangeably. A person can play both rolls at the same time 

WHAT DOES A LEADER DO?


  1. Inspires 
  2. Motivates 
  3. Directs 
  4. Communicates 

WHAT DOES A MANAGER DO?

  1. Plans 
  2. Organizes
  3. Monitors 
  4. Improves 

PLANNING FOR CHANGE 

Six steps for planning 

1. Define the direction for change 

2. Analyze for change 

3. Identify change Objectives 

4. Plan tasks 

5. Readiness assessment 

6. Implementation 


Define the direction for change 


It is an effective tools used by world leaders to inspire about change and excite them to support it business leaders tend not to set a vision for their change projects. 

As a result, employees do not feel convinced about the change and hence do not fully support it 


  • How would a leader formulate a vision?
  • A leader need to take in to account the following factors 
  • External factors; continue change technology, skills, tasks, structure of those companies 
  • Internal factor; include changes that is currently happing in the company culture and the resources needed.
  • The people and stakeholders; what excites them? What do they aspire to? Skills? What are their goals? Priorities? What inspires them?

CHARACTERISTICS OF VISION OF CHANGE 

1. Be grounded on business knowledge, industry, organization, and technology 

2. Be concrete and specific 

3. Have a clear destination 

4. Presents a clear contracts between current and preferred conditions

5. Be focused on the medium or long-term 

6. Stretch people 

7. Tie in with the needs and desires of others 

8. Provide a sense of significance 

STEP 2- ANALYZING FOR THE CHANGE 


The company capacity for change is the first thing that we need to analyze in other to answer two important questions 

What do you need to change? 

How much can we change and need to change?

THE AREAS TO BE ANALYZED INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING 



  • Staff’s skills and capabilities; (technical and non-technical staff)
  • Business system, structure, and procedures 
  • Work procedures; 

1. For e.g; a Warehouse needs a clear Procedures for managing stock and controlling costs

2. Are the procedure clear enough for all the staff to follow 


  • Availability of resources 

STEP 3; IDENTIFYING CHANGE OBJECTIVES 



  • Vision to objectives 
  • Why do we need the objective for change?
  • To make it clear to staff the targets they should achieve 
  • These targets also serve as milestones for periodic performance measurement 
  • Reasonably high targets can motivate people to be more innovative and focused to achieve objectives 
  • Clear and reasonably high targets also help to prevent complacency 

FIVE CRITERIA FOR GOOD OBJECTIVES 


1. Specific 

2. Measureable 

3. Achievable 

4. Relevant 

5. Time bound 

STEP 4; PLANNING TASKS 


Determine the scope of the change project 

Establish a timescale and budget 

Identify the project’s sponsors 

Identify change agent 

Schedule the tasks 

Build an infrastructure to support the change 

Establish a communication plan


WHY SHOULD WE PREPARE FOR READINESS ASSESSMENT 

To ensure that all key players are well prepared for the change 

To know the riskiest factors to focus on before embarking on the change 

What to assess?

Awareness 

Acceptance 

Ownership 

Commitment 

THERE ARE 4 PHASES OF A PERSUASION CAMPAIGN 


The biggest change in making a change is to convince and persuade people about the need for change 

FOUR PHASES OF PERSUASION CAMPAIGN 


  • Phase 1 – announcing the change 
  • Phase 2 – creating the frame 
  • Phase 3 – managing the mood 
  • Phase 4 – reinforcing good habits 

PHASE 1 – ANNOUNCING THE CHANGE 

What is the goal? 

The goal is to ensure that staff seriously listen to tough messages, 

Question old assumption 

Consider new ways of working 

Common challenges that occur when a change plan is introduced, include; 

Cynicism, skepticism, and knee- jerk resistance 


HOW TO INITIATE THE CHANGE EFFECTIVELY? 

Break old habits 

• Re-interpret old habits negatively 

Invoke a major threat from the outside

Emphasize the unattractiveness of past habits 

• Introduce the change through a vision 

• Introduce the change using a moral purpose 


PHASE 2 – CREATING THE FRAME 

Ensure that staff Understands and interprets the proposal for change 

FRAME CONSIST OF 

Company – wide presentations 

Public media 

Internal communication channels 

Change agents 

Special assistance unit 

Suggestion boxes 


PHASE 3 – MANAGING THE MOOD 


Leaders should pay close attention to employee’s emotions in other to adapt to change 

What should be done?

Acknowledge staff feeling and efforts 

Efforts and accomplishment have been recognized and recognized and rewarded 

Leaders should use/ send encourage messages to employees 

Keeping them informed about the projects achievements and progress 

How to do it? 

Use all communication cahnnels of the frame

Hold an aay day or outdoor activities 

Use of motivating incentives and rewards (spot awards)

Celebrate achievements 


PHASE – 4; REINFORCING GOOD HABITS 

The toughest challenge for leaders during change project is to prevent staff from backsliding into dysfunctional routines and undesirable behavior 

The leader needs to provide them with opportunities to practice them 

HOW? 

1. Use both formal and informal communication 

2. Informal communication include the leader having lurch with workers or talking to staff during coffee break. 

3. Set an example through day to day behaviour

4. Set am examples through business decisions 

5. Use rewards/punishment 


RESISTANCE AND STRATEGIES 

Lack of conviction that change is needed 

Dislike of imposed change 

Dislike of surprise 

Fear of the unknown 

Fear of in adequacy and failure 

Practices, habits, and relations disturbed 

Lack of respect for the people who initiate and lead the change 


Strategies to minimize negative reactions



Emotional response
Strategies
Denial
Avoid confrontation
Strengthen relationships
One step at a time approach 
Anger
Do not take it personally
Encourage open dialogue  
Bargaining
Negotiate
Stand ground
Discuss rationales
Depression
Provide support and training
Increase two way communication
Encourage responsibility
Exploration
Acknowledge progress
Build confidence
Encourage further efforts
Acceptance
Recognize and reward
Identify learning points 

STRATEGIES TO MANAGE RESISTANCE 

  1. Education and communication 
  2. Participation
  3. Providing support 
  4. Negotiation 
  5. Co-opting 

Activities 

You are the manager of a purchasing department. The deputy general manager asked you to meet with him to discuss the proposal for change that you sent him two weeks earlier. In that proposal you suggested to change the procedures for material purchasing orders. Four years ago, the Deputy General Manager approved a system that requires all 'request for material purchasing' issued from departments to be approved by him before sending them to the purchasing department for processing. His objective was to prevent waste caused by ordering unnecessary items or excessive amounts of materials. However, because of his busy schedule and frequent travels, materials are often not purchased on time. You have proposed that department managers sign the purchasing order and then report such orders quarterly. Your relationship with the Deputy General Director is not very close. However, you have been working well with him for 10 years.

Questions - What are the possible resistance you may face?

Using the Case Study above, who may offer resistance?

On the issues of feasibility study reports and business plan; this is the backbone of any business success. Failure to get this phase right may lead to business failure in the nearest future. Let’s start by breaking it down for easy understanding 

What are the Reasons for Feasibility Study Report

Intuitively, a feasibility study report is a document that is prepared after a feasibility study has been carried out. It contains in-depth analysis, projections, cost estimates, production requirements, production processes, and is the ultimate tool to determine whether a business should be started or not.

As a matter of facts, feasibility study starts first by carrying out a comprehensive market research, which results will show the market size, their demographics, genders, age brackets, number of businesses operating in the industry, and much more.

These results are then put together in the report along with their cost projections, and will ultimately show whether the business is worth doing or not.

What are the Reasons for A Business Plan


In like manner, a business plan is a strategy and tactical document that is prepared after a successful feasibility study has been carried out. It is written based on the results of a feasibility study, and focuses instead on how the business can achieve a successful market penetration and growth.

Although, a business plan also contains financial projections, cash flow statements, balance sheets, profit and loss statements, break even analysis, and much more. It shows how profitable or not the business will be after acting on the results gotten from the feasibility study, and what it can do to either grow its revenues or change its focus to another industry.

Challenges of both business plans and feasibility studies


Furthermore, business plans and feasibility studies attempt to predict future outcomes using assumptions about what is likely to happen in the business environment -- the economy and the company's competition. But this environment is always changing and the assumptions a company uses in its projections of revenue or profit may prove to be incorrect. Companies find that some of the strategies in their plan do not work to the degree the business owner expected, and have to be adjusted. In the case of a feasibility study, an incorrect conclusion can be especially costly -- it could mean launching a venture that has very little chance of surviving or approving a project that wastes the company's human and financial resources.

Feasibility Study vs Business Plan – What’s the Difference

  1. A feasibility study is carried out with the aim of finding out the workability and profitability of a business venture. Before anything is invested in a new business venture, a feasibility study is carried out to know if the business venture is worth the time, effort and resources, while a business plan is developed only after it has been established that a business opportunity exist and the venture is about to commence. This simply means that a business plan is prepared after a feasibility study has been conducted.
  2. A feasibility study is all about business idea viability while a business plan deals with business growth plan and sustainability.
  3. A feasibility study report reveals the profit potential of a business idea or opportunity to the entrepreneur, while a business plan helps the entrepreneur raise the needed startup capital from investors.
  4. A feasibility report is filled with calculations, analysis and estimated projections of a business opportunity. While a business plan is made up of mostly tactics and strategies to be implemented in other to start and grow the business.

THE LIFE CYCLE OF A BUSINESS

The life cycle of a business refers to the key stages (start up, growth, maturity and decline) that occur over the life of a business. Each stage has its own unique challenges and opportunities that must be taken into consideration. The business plan should describe a specific strategy for how to deal effectively with each stage.
The following provides a description of the four main stages of a business life cycle:
  • Start Up
In the start-up phase, the product and demand for it is under development. Sales are generally low, and earnings may even be negative. Competition may slowly encroach on earnings during this stage, as other businesses become aware of the market potential. At this stage, demand for the new product or service must be created, requiring intensive marketing campaigns and promotions. There is risk at this stage. Will consumers accept the product or service being offered at the price required?
  • Growth Stage
In the growth stage, there are increasing sales as the business grows into new markets, and costs fall due to economies of scale, allowing profitability to increase. Within this stage, marketing risk decreases as consumer acceptance and consumer brand loyalty increases. The risk in the growth stage is related to the inevitable increase in competition from new entrants.
  • Maturity
In this stage, businesses in the industry are becoming more efficient. Those who are more efficient earn a competitive advantage over those who are not. At this stage, however, competition and/or alternative product promotion can be aggressive. The risk in this stage is that increased competition may result in slowing growth rates
  • Decline
In the stage of decline, the market has become saturated, the technology changes or consumer tastes have moved on. Sales volume declines if the product or service has not kept up with those changes, or if the industry has moved on to the next thing. Companies in this position may sell production assets that are no longer required, move to areas that offer reduced facility and/or labour costs, withdraw from that market, or merge with other companies.
  • IDEA ASSESSMENT
Great business ideas can come from many sources, but generally they are a result of creative thinking that reflects new insights into an existing product or service. Every great business idea provides an opportunity to create economic value for the business.
The idea must meet or create a customer need, provide a competitive advantage, allow for appropriate time-to-market, and provide a reasonable return to investors.
A useful tool to provide an assessment of a business idea is a SWOT analysis created by the Boston Consulting Group. A SWOT analysis is a strategic planning method used to evaluate the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats that prevail at a particular time, for a project or business venture.

Internal factors – The strengths and weaknesses internal to the organization.
  1. Strengths: attributes of the organization that is helpful to achieving the objective.
  2. Weaknesses: attributes of the organization that is harmful to achieving the objective.
  3. External factors – The opportunities and threats presented by the external environment to the organization 
  4. Opportunities: external conditions those are helpful to achieving the objective.
  5. Threats: external conditions which could do damage to the business’s performance or work against achieving the objective.
Within an organization, features that may represent strengths with respect to one objective may be weaknesses for another objective. The factors may include personnel, finance, manufacturing capabilities, and so on.

External factors may include macroeconomic matters, technological change, legislation, and sociocultural changes, as well as changes in the marketplace or competitive position.

The results of a SWOT are often presented in the form of a matrix.
The next steps in planning for achievement of the selected objective can follow from whatever is revealed in the SWOT.

The plan needs to show how the business will use its strengths, mitigate or backfill its weaknesses, seize opportunities and defuse or dodge threats.

A SWOT analysis is just one method of analysis, and has its own weaknesses. For example, it may tend to persuade companies to compile lists, rather than think about what is actually important in achieving objectives. It may also present the resulting lists uncritically and without clear prioritization so that, for example, weak opportunities may appear to balance strong threats.

It is prudent not to prematurely eliminate any candidate SWOT entry. The importance of each item generated will be revealed by the value of the strategies it generates. A SWOT item that produces valuable strategies is important. A SWOT item that generates no strategies is not important.

Guidelines for of completing a SWOT Analysis

  1. Be as specific as possible. Avoid any grey areas or generalities.
  2. Describe internal factors in terms of the competition: as superior, better than, equal to or worse than your competition.
  3. Be as realistic as possible regarding your strengths and weaknesses.
  4. Always be Objective and
  5. Keep the SWOT analysis as simple as possible, but include any and all relevant issues.
  6. One of the points of doing a SWOT analysis is that it helps to generate an appropriate and open conversation among the group, about the reality of the situation. A realistic assessment increases the opportunity to create an effective plan. Try to use the SWOT to generate that conversation.
SWOT Analysis for Initial Business Idea or Feasibility of the Business Idea

Components of Feasibility Study
The components of feasibility are outlined in this section to provide a cooperative with a guide when developing a study or have received a completed study from a consultant. In order for a business to succeed the feasibility study is the first step to creating a viable business entity. 

MARKET FEASIBILITY

Market feasibility identifies whether the product or service is viable within the competitive environment of the industry or marketplace. The study needs to identify and assess individual opportunities, and provide rationalization to proceed with that opportunity, or assess other alternatives. The study needs to include the total market potential and incorporate customer opinions regarding the particular service or product.

The Industry Description

The industry description examines the industry or market segment and provides an assessment of its potential size and scope. The industry description should determine if the industry or market segment is stable, expanding or contracting, and what part of the industry life cycle it occupies. The description should also discuss the industry’s primary purpose, market served, scope in terms of annual sales, range of products and services, customer groups and major competitors. The history of the industry, how it changed and grown (or contracted) over time is also helpful. Changes in consumer demand, products and services, delivery and distribution models should be considered.

Here are some of the concepts that an industry description will help with:

  • Industry Competitiveness
Traditionally, competition between two or more businesses drives profits lower. A highly concentrated industry or market segment is one in which market share is held by the few largest companies. When a very few companies hold, the vast majority of market share, there may be very little actual competition and the market may appear closer to a monopoly. An industry or market segment is considered to have low concentration when many companies own a small share of the market. An industry with very low concentration industry is considered to be fragmented, and as such can be highly competitive.
The amount of competition within an industry or market segment is influenced by the following:
  • Large number of businesses – This increases competition as many companies compete for a limited number of consumers and inputs.
  • Low market growth – This result in firms having to struggle for a slowly growing market share.
  • High fixed costs – When an industry has high fixed costs (the cost of getting into and staying in the business), then players need to look for efficiencies in the size of their operation to achieve economies of scale and increase their potential profit.
  • Perishable goods – These are required to be sold quickly, and cannot be inventoried for long. This may lead to price cutting and other competitive dynamics, as businesses may need to unload large volumes of the same product around the same time.
  • Limited exchange costs – This has to do with the cost to the customer of exchanging or switching products or services.
  • Industry or market segment consolidation cycles – If competition increases to a point where there are so many suppliers that supply starts to exceed demand, some businesses will fail and the industry will consolidate to the point where the supply meets demand.

  • Barriers to Entry

In theory, given a supply of capital, businesses should be able to enter an industry or market segment without barriers. In reality, this is seldom the case. There are a number of factors that restrict the ability of new businesses to enter and start operating in a particular industry.

The ease with which someone else can enter a market determines the likelihood that a business will face new competitors. The easier it is to enter the industry or market, the faster profits will be eroded by competition. On the other hand, the harder it is for new entrants to appear, the longer the competitive advantage lasts. Mature businesses have often developed greater operational efficiencies because they faced the pressure of competition and found ways to dig in and remain viable.

The ease of entry into an industry or market segment depends upon two factors: how high are the barriers to entry in that industry, and how existing players react to new entrants. Existing competitors are most likely to react strongly against new entrants when there is a history of such behaviour, when the existing competitors have invested substantial resources, and when the industry is characterized by slow growth. In other words, the more that existing businesses have invested in the game, and the less there is to go around, the more likely they are to react strongly against newer players.
Research Process 

Businesses may conduct market research at varying degrees of complexity or frequency. For example, a business might use a simple questionnaire to determine the demand in a small market, or may hire a professional market research firm to conduct research to assist them in developing a marketing strategy to launch a new product. Larger firms may have their own specialists on staff.

Regardless of the simplicity or complexity of your market research project, the Small Business Association of America believes that the following seven market research steps must be completed to provide accurate information:

Step One: Define Marketing Problems and Opportunities 

The market research process begins with identifying and defining the problems and opportunities that exist for your business, such as:
• Launching a new product or service
• Low awareness of your company and its products or services
• Low uptake of your company’s products or services (the market is familiar with your company, but still is not doing business with you)
• A poor company image and reputation
• Problems with distribution; your goods and services are not reaching the buying public in a timely manner

Step Two: Set Objectives, Budget, and Timetables 


Objective: With a marketing problem or opportunity defined, the next step is to set objectives for your market research operations.
Budget: How much money are you willing to invest in your market research? How much can you afford? Your market research budget is a portion of your overall marketing budget. If you are planning on launching a new product or business, market research should account for as much as 10 per cent of your expected gross sales. 
Timetables: Prepare a detailed, realistic timeframe to complete all steps of the market research process. If your business operates in cycles, establish target dates that will allow the best accessibility to your market.

Step Three: Select Research Types, Methods, and Techniques 

There are two types of research: primary research (original information gathered for a specific purpose) and secondary research (information that already exists somewhere but needs to be interpreted for your use).

Step Four: Design Research Instruments 

The most common research instrument is the questionnaire. Keep these tips in mind when designing your market research questionnaire.
• Keep it simple.
• Begin the survey with general questions and move towards more specific questions.
• Design a questionnaire that is graphically pleasing and easy to read.
• Remember to pre-test the questionnaire. • Mix the form of the questions. 

Step Five: Collect Data 

To help you obtain clear, unbiased and reliable results, collect the data under the direction of experienced researchers.

Step Six: Organize and Analyze the Data 

Once your data has been collected, it needs to be cleaned. Cleaning research data involves editing, coding, and tabulating results. To make this step easier, start with a simply designed research instrument or questionnaire.

Step Seven: Present and Use Market Research Findings

Once marketing information about your target market, competition and environment is collected and analyzed, present it in an organized manner for use by the business.

Marketing Concepts

1. Commodities and Differentiated products

Commodities and differentiated products are the two ends of the product spectrum. A product is a commodity when all units of production are identical, regardless of who produces them. A differentiated product can be easily distinguished from those of its competitors. On the continuum between commodities and differentiated products, there are many degrees and combinations.
Commodities

A commodity means that each unit of a commodity is exactly like every other unit. For example, every bushel of number 1 Canadian Red Spring Wheat 11.5 per cent protein can be substituted for every other bushel of number 1 Canadian Red Spring Wheat 11.5 per cent protein. Because the identity of each producer’s wheat does not have to be kept separate, the wheat from many farmers can be mixed together. This also means that the price for wheat on any given day, at any given location, is the same for all farmers.

Commodities tend to be raw materials like corn, wheat, copper, crude oil, etc. Only commodities can be traded on “futures” markets because every unit is the same. Commodities are often inputs to other (“finished”) products. These finished products may in turn be differentiated ones.

2. Price Takers

People that produce commodities are referred to as “price takers.” This means that an individual producer has no control over his/her price. On any day, the producer must take what the market offers.

3. Differentiated Products

A company’s product is a differentiated product if it is unique and cannot be substituted for a competitor’s product. If the product is different, the producer can make the case that it is better. If it is a better product, in the eyes of customers, and they are willing to pay more, then the company can charge a higher price for it. The customers can see a difference in value between it and a possible substitute.

4. Price Maker

The producer of a differentiated product is said to be a price maker rather than a price taker. A price maker has some influence over price, but not as much as most people believe. Essentially, a producer of a differentiated product creates a separate market for that product, to the extent that they are able to do so through marketing activities and demand.

5. Perceptions Are Everything

There is the false perception in agriculture that the emergence of niche markets provides for unlimited product differentiation. For example, the organic milk market niche offers you the opportunity to differentiate your milk from commodity milk. While it does allow you to differentiate your milk from commodity milk, your organic milk is not necessarily a differentiated product.
Producing organic milk puts you in a different (albeit smaller) commodity market. Your product is no different than any other organic producer’s milk.

6. The Value Added Differentiated Fallacy

Differentiation only takes place when the product you produce is seen as different. So you need to convince organic milk purchasers that your organic milk is better than that of your competitors. One way of doing this is to create a brand for your product (e.g. Johnson’s Better Organic Milk), and promote your brand to organic milk purchasers.

7. Target Marketing

Target Marketing is the practice of directing the marketing effort at a specific market segment. A target market, or segment, on which a business may focus, is a group of potential buyers that the business believes will want to or do want to buy that product.

8. What is Branding? 

Branding is one of the most important factors influencing an item’s success or failure in today’s marketplace. A brand is a combination of name, words, symbols, design, reputation and association. It identifies a product and/or its company and differentiates it from competition.

9. Niche Marketing 

Niche marketing is marketing a product or service in a small portion of a market that is not being readily served by the mainstream product or service providers. These “niches” can be geographic areas, a specialty industry, a specific demographic or ethnic group, one gender, a specific interest group, or other special group of people.

10. Ethnic Marketing

What is ethnicity? It is a multidimensional expression of identity that includes race, origin or ancestry, language and religion. It is influenced by immigration, blending and intermarriage, which very often influence the strength of ethnic identification. It is often associated with cultural practices, customs and beliefs and sometimes dress and eating habits. Ethnicity depends partly on self-identification. Everyone chooses whether they want to identify with a particular ethnic group or not.
Identifying with more than one group is more and more common, as cultural mixing is increasingly on the rise.

Lets Develop A Business Plans And A Feasibility For You  


Why the worry, when Chris farm Nigeria specializes on such issues, Contact them today to fix that up for you.

On the issues of grant, and government financing issues, Chris Farm Nigeria has written several thousand business plans and feasibility reports for candidate who finally won the competitions and also got the fund on the long run.
Instant of going around, and putting yourself on the horns of dilemma, Specialist can help you do the job.




Catfish Production, Farming, Marketing, Business Plans and Feasibility Report


Engage CHRIS FARM NIGERIA to give you a professional business plans and a feasibility that will suit you demand today.


Chris Farm Nigeria develops well self-explanatory, irresistible feasibility studies or business plan for your Business start ups, Business Growth or Expansions through either personal funds, Grants, or loans, which could be new or existing ones. We delight in writing for people under Academic sectors, production sectors, manufacturing sectors, processing or packing sectors, advertising sectors, marketing sectors and other related sectors on mini, middle and large scale businesses.

For your Agribusiness, either production, processing, marketing of any Agro-industry, our feasibility studies or business plan are explicit.

Generally, our feasibility study and business plans are developed so well that it becomes irresistible when you show them to your investors or sponsors. It gives you a clear picture of what you are expected to see when you put the feasibility study or business plans into use. It also shows how much it will cost you to own your desired business, what your money can afford. The kinds of product you will need to minimize input in other to maximize output, and how much returns you will get at the end of each accounting year until your business break-even on its initial investment capital. This will give the intending business person or investor or farmer, a vivid idea on the possible benefit he or she stands to gain, when he or she starts doing the business. With that, the intending business person or investor or farmer will not need a soothsayer to make decision for him or her.


You can use this format in developing your own business Plans and feasibility Study 

OUR TABLE OF CONTENT INCLUDE;

  • SECTION I – EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
  • NAME OF BUSINESS / COMPANY
  • OFFICE & SITE LOCATION
  • MOTIVATION
  • MISSION STATEMENT
  • SOCIAL/ECONOMIC VALUE
  • PROJECT STATUS & START UP
  • WHY PREPARE THIS BUSINESS PLAN?
  • SECURITIES FOR THE PROPOSED LOAN
  • REPAYMENT
  • SECTION II – STUDY AREA
  • STUDY AREA
  • COMPANY OVERVIEW
  • MANAGEMENT TEAM
  • DEPARTMENTS IN THE COMPANY
  • EXPERIENCE
  • MANAGEMENT TEAM GAPS
  • SECTION III – INDUSTRY ANALYSIS
  • DEFINING YOUR INDUSTRY
  • YOUR INDUSTRY SIZE GROWTH RATE AND SALES PROJECTIONS
  • INDUSTRY STRUCTURE
  • MARKET OVERVIEW
  • MARKET SEGMENTATION
  • RELEVANT MARKET SIZE
  • KEY SUCCESS FACTORS
  • LONG TERM PROSPECTIVE
  • MARKET CHARACTERISTICS
  • SAMPLING TECHNIQUE
  • SECTION IV – CUSTOMER ANALYSIS
  • TARGET CUSTOMERS
  • CUSTOMER NEEDS
  • MARKET NEEDS / SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS
  • BUYERS BEHAVIOUR
  • MARKET SHARE
  • SALES FORECASTING
  • SECTION V – COMPETITIVE ANALYSIS
  • DIRECT COMPETITORS
  • COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES
  • SECTION VI – MARKETING PLAN
  • PRODUCTS & SERVICES
  • FINISHED PRODUCTS
  • PRODUCT QUALITY AND PRODUCTION QUANTITY
  • PRODUCTION CAPACITY
  • PRICING
  • PROMOTIONS PLAN
  • DISTRIBUTION PLAN
  • SECTION VII – OPERATIONS PLAN
  • GENERAL APPROACH TO PRODUCTION
  • TECHNICAL ANALYSIS / PRODUCTION PROCESS
  • EQUIPMENT
  • PACKAGING REQUIREMENTS
  • SECTION VIII – FINANCIAL PLAN
  • REVENUE MODEL
  • FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
  • FINANCIAL ASSUMPTIONS
  • FINANCE CHARGES
  • FINANCIAL PROJECTIONS
  • FUNDING REQUIREMENTS/USE OF FUNDS
  • CRITICAL ASSUMPTIONS



  • FINANCIAL MODELS
  • SUMMARY OF PROJECT COST
  • BUDGET OF FIXED ASSETS / CAPITAL EXPENSES / INVESTMENTS
  • DEPRECIATION
  • UTILITIES
  • OPERATING EXPENSES (OPEX)
  • TOTAL REQUIRED INVESTMENT OUTLAY (REQUIRED START-UP CAPITAL)
  • FINANCING PLAN
  • INSTALLED / AVAILABLE EQUIPMENT
  • BREAK-EVEN ANALYSIS
  • LOAN REPAYMENT SCHEDULE AND INTEREST PAID
  • FORECAST OF PROFIT AND LOSS
  • CASH FLOW
  • BALANCE SHEET
  • GENERAL ASSUMPTIONS (BREAK EVEN ANALYSIS)
  • BUSINESS RATIOS - PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS
  • CONCLUSION
  • SECTION 3 – APPENDIX

   Click other related clicks that may interest you below;

 

Acceptable feasibility study and business plan for bank loans

Feasibility study on piggery farming business Agbarho community, delta state 

A PREPARED FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR CATFISH FARM IN NIGERIA 

“How to own, manage, and make millions from catfish farmingbusiness” BEST SELLER  

HOW TO OWN A MEGA FISH FARM BUSINESS IN NIGERIA

FLOATING FISH FEED PELLET MACHINE

TIPS ON BROILERS PRODUCTION AND ACTUAL VACCINATION –PROGRAMME AND TREATMENT

TIPS IN POULTRY MANAGEMENT

Sales of battery cage system in Nigeria

CASSAVA PROCESSING MACHINE

GRASS CUTTER/ CANE RAT PRODUCTION, BEST SELLER

How to handle and manage Snail farming

Rabbit Management

MANAGEMENT OF RABBITS, BEST SELLER



·         NOTE; According to our policy, we are not “allowed / permitted” to disclose peoples business or written feasibility study, “to anyone”, irrespective of their personality.

·        BUT, WE are permitted to display only executive summary.
·         This is just a sample of our executive summary on poultry feasibility study and business plan, carried out in Rivers State. 

·         1st sample;

These Feasibility study on poultry farming business (specializing on layers and boilers production), was conducted using projections, impressive publications, compounding interest/values, tables, graph, bar chart, pie chart, profits analysis and cash flow positions in other to give a clear picture of what is obtainable in that location, using eight plots of land, at Esemdiary village, Off Effurun Sapele Road, Okpe LGA of Delta state, Nigeria as a case study. 


Esemdiary village is a community in Okpe Local Government Area of Delta State with coordinates 05°26’N 5°57’E, which also plays the host community to the Warri Airport, which is actually located at Osubi. 


Okpe Local Government is a territory that used to be part of the original Okpe Kingdom, its headquarters is at Orerokpe, with a population of 128,398 people whose primary occupations include commercial farming, fishing, hunting, trading and gas exploration. 


After carrying out the feasibility study on Esemdiary village, Off Effurun-Sapele Road, Okpe LGA of Delta state, Nigeria, it was discovered that, farming generally will do well both on crop and animal production.

HOW TO PLACE AN ORDER NOW?

Payment Methods 


  • Bank Deposit 
  • Electronic Fund Transfer or western money transfer 
  • ATM cash Transfer 
This payment method requires the customer to deposit, Electronic
Fund Transfer or ATM cash Transfer directly from his/her account into any of CHRIS FARM NIGERIA bank accounts.

If it is an E-Book, project materials, written project or written feasibility study, it will be sent to your immediately as soon as your transaction reflects in our account.

Please note; it will take ten working days to write (or prepare) a feasibility study or a project on your request.
Our bank details are on the website page, Just click on payment to get them

After placing your order, SMS your payment information (Manual title,
Name on teller, payment teller number, and your e-mail address)
E.g. catfish, Kelechi Bisi Amina,531796,allpurpose@yahoo.com
To +2348036925718 or +2348051270981 once I confirm your payment.
The material will be sent to your immediately! By e-mail Trust us 100% to do that.

Advantages of sending your request via email your e-book (electronic book) is downloadable from your e-mail box which allows you to read and print out this book

• Zero shipping costs.
• No wasting time, forget having to wait weeks for postal delivery.
• No risk of products lost in the mail or damaged

Thinking that we might live you after your purchase? Definitely no!
With the CBN policy in Nigeria via bank verification number (BVN), is almost impossible to steal your money from bank transfer or bank payment.

We assure you of maximum support when you need us. Please, do not hesitate to ask us for the way forward.  

Get in touch with us today on our phone numbers or send us an email. We await your response……………………….

WRITTEN AND COMPILED BY CHRIS FARM NIGERIA

WEBSITE: www.chrisfarmnigeria.com
EMAIL: chrisfarmnigeria@gmail.com
PHONE: +234(803)-692-5718 or +234(805)-127-0981
LIKE US ON FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/chrisfarmnigeria 
FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: www.twitter.com/chrisfarm9ja

• A big thank you for your patronage in advance

Your Success, Is Our Optimum Desire

AT Chris farm Nigeria, We Deliver the Best Services…
  
Other services we render are displayed on our advert below;

 ADVERTISEMENT

  • We provide feasibility study/business plan for new and existing businesses
  • We help you to recruit staff for your company, firm or organizations
  • We help you in registering your company, firm or organizations
  • Suppliers of any food stuffs
  • Building contractor (especially building houses, constructions of ponds)
  • Provides Architect for any design
  • Help you in getting loans
  • Sales of fingerlings, table size catfish, chicks, Grass-cutters, rabbits, snails, and many more
  • Farm design
  • Feed formulation for general livestock, including
  • Floating/Sinking Fish feed
  • Soybean oil processing, Teachings on how to test soybean cake,
  • Teaching on how to remove the gummy and unpleasant smell of soybean oil
  • Palm Oil/Palm nut cracking
  • Fish Farming (Pond Construction and Fingerlings distribution)
  • Poultry farm (plus marketing ideas)
  • Rabbit farming
  • Snail Farming
  • Grass-cutter/cane rat Farming
  • Commercial Crop Farming
  • Handwork/Workshop Plan
  • Pure Water Business
  • Nylon production
  • Professional Website design (cooperate and personal)
  • Bulk SMS (plus re-seller website)
  • Business Software Design
  • Logo design plus company slogan
  • Printing Press (Graphic design, lithography, banners, poster, handbills etc)
  • Sales of battery cage for livestock farming all over Nigeria
  • E-books on; Broilers farming, Layers farming, Grass-cutter farming, Rabbit farming, Pig farming, Catfish farming, and many more……
  • How to own, manage, and make millions from catfish production (Most demanded)
  • Projecting writing, Sales of written projects, and many more……


Related Topics includes;

Powered by Blogger.